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Buskro Tabbers - BK730 Tabbing Machines

smallbk730When It Comes To Tabbers - The Buskro BK730 Is A Tabbing Machine

Ahead Of Its Time

The BK730 is the first mail tabber in the mail equipment industry to offer total portability for labeling applications, with all of the electronics and controls self-contained in the tabbing machine head itself. It can be mounted on a variety of mailing transports or directly onto bindery or finishing lines. The standard over-sized label tray is another industry-leading feature, allowing for labels up to 3 inches wide (post-it notes for instance) by 7 inches long. The easy glide head positioning, easy to thread tab and label path and easy waste removal improve production efficiency with reduced setup times.

doubletabber 250 copyAdvanced Motion Control Is Built Into The BK730 tabber machine, allowing smooth, quiet operation, reduced backer tearing, and high production rates (up To 35,000 Pieces Per Hour).  Tabbing equipment just doesn't get much better than this.

bumpturn300**In keeping with the tradition of offering innovative mail equipment solutions, Buskro has developed an attached Bump-Turn option for the BK730 Tabbing Machine. The new bump-turn option allows you to easily change the orientation of your mail pieces as they exit your inkjet addressing machine, envelope inserter, or folding machine; all without the need to invest in a separate piece of mailing equipment! You can add the bump-turn option to a new tabber or even upgrade your current BK730.

See a video of the Bump-Turn option below:

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Run the Buskro Tabbing Machine In-Line with an inkjet or folder, or Off-Line as a standalone system!

Click Here for BK730 Tabber Brochure!


Here is a video showing the integrated Buskro bump-turn and two Buskro tabbers running after the inkjet. Notice how the speed is synchronized?  One speed control adjusts both tabbers!


Here is a better look at the bump-turn: